A new vaccine has been found to stop rhesus macaque moneys from infection with SIV, the monkey form of the HIV virus

New Vaccine Unexpectedly Suppresses HIV Infection In Monkeys

A new vaccine has been found to stop rhesus macaque moneys from infection with SIV, the monkey form of the HIV virus

A new vaccine has been found to stop rhesus macaque monkeys from being infected with SIV, the monkey form of the HIV virus

An international research team, with scientists based in Paris-Descartes University in France, as well as the University of Chinese Medicine in Guangzhou, China, has developed a new orally administered vaccine that was found to block the SIV virus from infecting rhesus macaque monkeys. The vaccine was also able to reduce the number of SIV virus particles in monkeys who had already contracted the virus.

The team of researchers who developed the vaccine described the results as ‘surprising’ and ‘unexpected,’ due to the simplicity of the vaccine.

The vaccine works by inhibiting, rather than eliciting, an immune response. The HIV and SIV viruses actually require CD4 T-cells to replicate and proliferate in the body, so one of the aims of a prophylactic HIV vaccine is to introduce the virus into the body and cause the body to develop an immune tolerance to the virus.

The results of the monkey study were published in a report in the journal ‘Frontiers in Immunology.’

The vaccine works because it is given with bacteria that are endemic to the body.

Perhaps this method can be replicated in humans to develop the first HIV vaccine. Two phase 1 trials are now planned in humans.

Read more about it here: Scientists have “unexpectedly” found a vaccine that completely blocks HIV infection in monkeys

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