Novartis teams with India’s Biological E for typhoid vaccine development

In Featured on App, Partnering and Corporate strategy, Prophylactic Vaccines, R&D by tim peplowLeave a Comment

typhoid vaccine novartis biological e (nathan reading)

Novartis and Indian biopharma Biological E have entered into a development and licensing agreement  to deliver accessible and affordable typhoid and paratyphoid A vaccines to the developing world.

Yearly, over 21 million cases and 5 million cases of typhoid and paratyphoid A fever respectively are reported, with many typhoid victims being children younger than two for which there is no widely available typhoid vaccine. No vaccine is available for any age group for paratyphoid fever, which is caused by the bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A. Typhoid fever is a significant problem in developing countries, and is associated with poor access to clean water and proper sanitation. With the disease causing 200,000 deaths per year and increasing resistance to antibiotics, an effective vaccine is urgently needed.

The Novartis Vaccines Institute for Global Health (NVGH) aims to de-risk and reduce the costs of vaccine manufacture for the developing world by undertaking the translational research required to gain human Proof of Concept before transferring this knowledge to manufacturers.

NVGH, with the help of funding by the Fondazione Monte dei Paschi di Siena and Regione Toscana through the Sclavo Vaccines Association, has developed a typhoid vaccine, Vi-CRM197, which it will now transfer to Biological E for manufacturing, further clinical development, approval and eventual distribution. A second vaccine, a combined typhoid-paratyphoid vaccine, will also be transfered to Biological E once NVGH has completed early small-scale studies.

In February, GSK and Biological E established a 50/50 joint venture to develop a 6-in-1 vaccine that combines GSK's injectable polio vaccine with Biological E's vaccine for diptheria, tetanus, whooping cough, hepatitis B and Haemophilus influenzae b. The vaccine is expected to enter Phase I in the next two years.

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Read the press release here >

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